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Seven Hills police on alert during presidential vote count, respond to polling place disturbance

Seven Hills police on alert during Presidential vote count, respond to polling place disturbance
Seven Hills police on alert during Presidential vote count, respond to polling place disturbance
Seven Hills police on alert during Presidential vote count, respond to polling place disturbance
Posted at 10:59 PM, Nov 04, 2020
and last updated 2020-11-04 23:20:22-05

SEVEN HILLS, Ohio — Seven Hills police report they were called to a city polling location at the Hillside Middle school on Election Day after a man trying to cast his ballot started yelling at a polling place volunteer.

Police said 44-year-old Matthew Cantrall started yelling at a poll worker after he was denied a ballot because the information on his identification didn't match his voter information.

Investigators said Cantrall left the middle school and didn't stop for police as he drove his car into traffic on a busy Hillside Road filled with cars and pedestrians.

Lt. Daniel Kappus with the Seven Hills Police Department told News 5 Cantrall was pulled over after a short chase, was handcuffed and placed in a police car without incident, and was later released at the scene.

“Our officers take the safety and security of all people involved extremely seriously," Lt. Kappus said.

“More particularly, especially during this contentious election, we need to be on more high alert."

“People were waiting in long lines to cast their votes, foot traffic, people walking up and down Hillside Road for someone to drive like this.”

“He was disorderly and disruptive toward the election process on Election Day.”

Seven Hills resident Lucy McKernan was visiting the polling place and witnessed the disturbance

“The officer pounded on his door and said ’stop’ and he once again refused,” McKernan said.

“If we had been only 10 seconds earlier, we might have been hit, he was not looking at all.”

“The cars were backing up, that’s why there were officers already on the scene, it was just mayhem.”

“There is no reason to yell at poll workers, who are out just doing their civic duty, put everyone at risk, and pulling out into traffic.”

News 5 spoke with Matthew Cantrall by telephone and he told us he didn't think he yelled that loudly inside the polling place.

Cantrall said he was simply frustrated after waiting in line for three hours and then being told he could get a ballot.

He said he'll plead not guilty to the disorderly conduct charge filed against him when he appears in Seven Hills Mayor's Court on Nov. 10.