Seville first responders help deliver baby boy on the side of a highway

SEVILLE, Ohio - Every first responder has a story to tell about a memorable call they received while on the job — for the Seville police and fire Departments — they can add delivering a baby on the side of the highway to their list.

According to the Seville-Guilford Fire & EMS Facebook page, crews helped deliver a healthy baby boy on the side of 224 East at the Ohio 3 exit Friday morning at 11:21 a.m.

"I was like I can't. I can't hold him in," mother Carissa Batdor said.

"I look over and see hair, and I'm like, 'I've gotta pull over, I see the head coming out,'" father Devin Batdorf said.

Devin said that's when he dialed for help.

"I'm on the phone with 911 and she's just talking me through everything. She didn't calm me down, but she talked me through everything."

Sara Buca with the Medina County Sheriff's office was on the other end of the line.

"It all just happened so quickly," she said.

Luckily, the Batdorf's said Seville's first responders weren't into the whole waiting thing either.

"They got there right in the knick of time, right when he popped out they were there," Devin said.

"We cut the cord and still delivered the placenta in the car," Brittany Rufener with Seville Fire and EMS said.

"His color was good, he was crying. We suctioned him and got him all cleaned up," Tammy Johnson, also with Seville Fire and EMS, said.

The boy's name is Roman Matthew. He is Carissa and Devin's third child.

Carissa and Devin said they were prepared for a potentially complicated delivery. Romas was diagnosed with a hear problem halfway through the pregnancy, so they wanted to deliver at Akron General.

They weren't quite the complications they'd prepared for, but after getting to the hospital quickly, the couple said they couldn't be happier to be holding their happy and healthy baby boy.

Carissa and Devin met at the Seville Fire Station on Monday to thank the people who helped welcome their baby boy into the world.

"It's all thanks to them. We wouldn't know what to do," Devin said.

"We typically are called on the worst day of people's lives and for once we are called on the best day of somebody's life," Rufener said.

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