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Feeling the pressure? Get active with the family

Feeling the pressure? Get active with the family
Posted at 1:51 PM, May 06, 2020
and last updated 2020-05-06 13:51:02-04

Fitting fitness into work, school, and endless distractions at home probably feels impossible.

But one Valley gym owner says your health, both physically and mentally, is worth adapting for.

"And... go! Try to keep those arms up," said Jenna Walsh, as she cheered on her three young children doing sit-ups in their living room.

Right now, Walsh is their mom and their school teacher. However, she said she prefers the recess portion of the day with them when they all work out together.

"On days where, like, I feel like - whether I spent too much time on my phone or I was on social media or whatever, like those times, those days I'm like 'Okay, I'm cranky,'" Walsh explained. "I'm not as happy as a usually am. I'm taking it out on my kids. Where as times when we can exercise and spend that quality time together, it's just so much more calming and happy and a much better home environment for us."

She said she definitely notices a shift in her mental health, which is something that any family quarantining together can benefit from.

"Obviously, physiologically, there are benefits in releasing serotonin," explained Scottsdale gym owner Becky Hoodie. "You know, increased blood flow is just a benefit to every tissue in the body."

Hoodie owns TRANSFORM near the Loop 101 and Scottsdale Road.

She said, not only are you spending quality time with your family when you do fitness together, but you are also teaching them about good health habits.

"It's a great opportunity right now to have their whole focus with you," Hoodie said. "Instead of off to school and off to their little friends playtime and things like that."

Age does not matter when it comes to working out together.

"There is always something that you can do with them, absolutely!"

Hoodie used the Walsh family to demonstrate because the three children are all under the age of 8.

"Their energy is through the roof," Hoodie said. "You aren't used to expending that amount of energy, so kind of try to come together in a way that allows you to have activities together and... modify your own activity levels to meet theirs."

She said to stick to the basics, such as push-ups, jumping jacks, sit-ups, planks, etc.

Hoodie believes fitness does not have to be fancy to see some results, especially when it comes to your mental health.

This story was originally published by Scripps affiliate KNXV in Phoenix, Arizona.