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DeWine announces plan for first Medicaid overhaul in nearly 15 years

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Posted at 3:07 PM, Sep 29, 2020
and last updated 2020-09-29 17:04:12-04

COLUMBUS — During Gov. Mike DeWine's Tuesday press conference, he announced his vision for the first Medicaid overhaul in nearly 15 years.

DeWine said his office has met with doctors, hospitals and health care providers to find ways to improve health care in the state.

"We have developed a new plan, a new vision for Ohio’s Medicaid program. One that focuses on people and not just focuses on the business of managed care and vision of what we hope will be a better, healthier, more productive state of Ohio," DeWine said.

In the coming days, the Department of Medicaid will be rolling out a series of requests for applications and care plans.

On Wednesday, a new application will open for businesses interested in providing managed care plans for children and adults within the program.

"Selection plans, ones that are selected, will be an essential piece to improving the health and lives of millions of Ohioans. Not only will selected plans work with my administration to build better systems of care, but they also play a special role in helping their members develop good health habits, such as using primary care instead of the emergency rooms, getting needed vaccinations and attending prenatal visits for pregnant women, also helping to coordinate care for individuals with more complex health needs, ensuring that patients see their specialist, and take the needed medication," DeWine said.

The new program will focus on the following:

  • Improve care for children who have complex needs.
  • Emphasize a personalized care experience of the patient.
  • Improve wellness and health outcomes.
  • Give doctors and other medical providers more time to spend with patients.
  • Increase transparency and accountability.

A second managed care application will be issued later this fall to specifically serve children who have complex behavioral health needs.

If you use Medicaid currently, DeWine said the changes will not impact your coverage or access to care.