NewsLocal NewsTuscarawas County News

Actions

Some residents in Stark County using boats to get around after days of flooding

Posted: 12:52 PM, Mar 07, 2018
Updated: 2018-03-07 17:55:33-05
Photos: Part of Tuscarawas County under water
Photos: Part of Tuscarawas County under water
Photos: Part of Tuscarawas County under water
Photos: Part of Tuscarawas County under water
Photos: Part of Tuscarawas County under water
Photos: Part of Tuscarawas County under water

As a Nor'easter pounds the East Coast and incoming rain and snow are expected to hit parts of Northeast Ohio, residents in Stark and Tuscarawas Counties are still dealing with the aftermath of flooding caused by days of rain.

Officials said a four-mile stretch north of the Bolivar Dam is dealing with flooding issues.

The Tuscarawas County Scanner also received images which show fields turned into swamps on Dover Zoar Road off State Route 800.

Some residents in Pike Township in southern Stark County are using boats to get around, and they said the water levels have been high for two weeks. Much the affected area is farmland, and the water is pooling because of reduced flow through dams.

James Moore, who lives on Deuber Avenue, has been using a boat for days and is trying to keep his sense of humor on board.

"What's the problem with every 10 years having lakefront property?"

Kidding aside, Moore said he does worry about emergency response time in the event of a medical emergency since his street is flooded and closed.

"I had a heart attack one time. I called it in. Ten minutes, it (EMS) was here. If that happened again, it's gonna be a whole lot longer than 10 minutes," Moore said.

Stark County Emergency Management Director Tim Warstler said the U.S Army Corps of Engineers has been exercising flood control, holding more water out of the Bolivar Dam since levels are already extremely high.

"They're letting water out, but it's at a controlled rate and the water builds up behind the dam to prevent flooding downstream, so people that are having access issues in our county are literally preventing people from having their homes flooded," Warstler said.