Three Cleveland filmmakers debut 'Beautiful Garden' at Cleveland International Film Festival

CLEVELAND - The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnesses a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

The Cleveland International Film Festival brings in dozens of filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their films in Cleveland.

What you might miss are the local filmmakers who work in Cleveland fueling their creativity and provide employment, long after blockbusters film crews have used the city landscape and resources and left for Hollywood.

Three filmmakers who have all grown up in Cleveland and have traveled all over the country working in the film industry, now find themselves back home doing what they love in a city that has accelerated opportunities for filmmakers and creative artists to fuel their projects.

WATCH: Beautiful Garden trailer

Utopia put to the test

Director Christopher Peplin, producer Charles Moore, and executive producer J. Scott Scheel all found themselves working together on the same film from start to finish, which is a rare feat for filmmakers who come to a project with different ideas and perspectives.

The film, Beautiful Garden, is set against the backdrop of Lake Erie at an old, run-down house in Bratenahl. The house has been overtaken by squatters from various backgrounds who now find themselves living together.

In the attic, lives a mysterious man named King. When one of the residents witnessess a murder in the backyard, chaos ensues and this "utopia" is put to test.

Directing his first, Peplin's idea was rooted in his years of traveling with his military mother. From the Pacific Northwest to southern California, he heard many interesting stories from people living in squat houses.

"It seemed pretty obvious not only from a practical standpoint but from a creative stand perspective," Peplin said. It was the perfect opportunity to write a story that had a number of colorful characters from all walks of life that could create an interesting dynamic." 

Peplin wrote the script way before he even had a location in mind. A friend of Peplin's father found a property that was scheduled for demolition. He described it as "walking to on set that was ready for production," it was that perfect.

Creative collaboration

Scheel, who became executive producer of the film, joined Peplin and Moore in the early stages of production through a mutual friend who was an actress in the film.

"I had wanted to get behind a film for quite some time," Scheel said. "The thing that really struck me about the script was the characters reap what they sow. There was a certain part of his writing that had such subtly. I liked how Chris was able to weave so many story lines into one tight window of film was compelling enough."

RELATED: 5 movies filmed by local filmmakers in the 2017 Cleveland International Film Festival

The addition of Scheel to the film and the collaboration of the three from the beginning allowed Peplin's original script and vision to grow into something none of them thought imaginable. Instead of one location, they were able to expand outside of Bratenahl to places such as Lakewood and downtown Cleveland.

"Scott's support allowed us to take what was meant to be a small Indie film, that really was for me to just say I had done something and to get away from the negative stigma associated with a first time director, Peplin recalled. "It grew in a much larger scope that I originally envisioned."

Looking back at production, Moore says no matter if you have worked with someone before, a new project is always testing the waters. Each of the trio played a different role in the development of the film.

"Chris has a final say in what we do, no doubt but we put ourselves in a format where we could bounce ideas off one another," Scheel said. "We gave weight to each individual opinion. It helped us get through the process of making more than the first film you're trying to get under your belt and creating a legitimate production that has the opportunity to do something special."

Lessons learned

Through the process of directing and producing his first feature film, Peplin learned a lot through trial and error, and most importantly persistence.

"I would say to never give up because quite honestly making a feature film is the most difficult thing I have done by far," Peplin said. "There are so many bumps along the road, Murphy's Law is always working overtime and I think the trick is to problems will no doubt arise but you need to immediately find a solution and keep going.

The filmmaking industry is a challenging environment that is unlike any other industry. Production crews and cast come together for a short time together to only find themselves unlikely to ever see one another again.

"We are not curing cancer, I get that but when you take so many talented people who know their craft so particularly well and put them in an environment for 20 to 25 days, you are really assembling a 75 -80 person company to put this production together that will ultimately disband after 30 days and try to leave something that will have a resonating impression for years to come."

For Peplin, Scheel and Moore, filming in Cleveland is just the beginning. Growing up in Cleveland, leaving Cleveland, and eventually coming back to Cleveland opened their eyes to how the city has changed in the last decade.

"It such a diverse city in so many ways. It can double to about any city. Cleveland has an incredibly talented crew community here, said Peplin. "The filmmaking community may not be as publicized as New York or Chicago but the local film community here is very robust."

Moore adds, "For years we have been telling people to shoot in Cleveland and many ask 'Why not?' and I say 'Why not? Why not? There are many locations that have not been seen cinematically."

The premier of Beautiful Garden is on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:15 p.m. Find out all the information here.

Kaylyn Hlavaty covers news that's all about the pride we share in Cleveland. Have a story tip or idea? Drop her a line at kaylyn.hlavaty@wews.com or connect on Twitter: @kaylynhlavaty.

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