4 colors that will decrease the value of your home, according to Zillow

We all have our own preference when it comes to colors, but according to recent research, the paint colors we choose can directly impact the value of our homes.

Zillow analyzed 50,000 homes across the country to find that color decisions within a home can affect the final sale price of the home by over $1,000, give or take. The study discovered that while we all may not agree on our color choices, there are four paint colors in particular that should be avoided in order to get the maximum sale price for our homes.

Here are the colors that will decrease the value of your home, and that you should try to avoid at all costs.

1. Slate gray

Gray is a popular and well-liked paint color choice, but you have to be careful when choosing the shade. Choosing the wrong shade of gray may either increase or decrease the final sale price of your home by more than $1,000.

Homeowners who chose to use slate gray on their dining room walls, for example, got $1,100 below the expected sale price for their home. In contrast, living room walls that were painted dove or light gray helped increased a home’s value by $1,100.

2. Off-white

This might be the most surprising of the four offending colors. The study found that the use of off-white in some spaces—especially kitchens—can make a them feel flat or dead.

Homes with off-white or eggshell kitchens were found to go for $82 below market value.

3. Terracotta

This bold paint choice could put a dent of -$793 on the value of your home. Zillow found that homes with terracotta-colored living rooms sold for less than the expected value.

4. Dark brown

This color has been referred to as dirty, tar and even death (which sounds a little harsh if you ask me). When used in a bathroom or bedroom, dark brown lowered the final sale price by up to $469.

According to TIME, this color is disliked to the extent that the Australian Government almost used it as the color on cigarette packaging to make smoking less appealing.

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