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Cleveland hospital seeing increase in children testing positive for COVID-19

Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital
Posted at 7:05 PM, Jun 18, 2020
and last updated 2020-06-19 12:10:01-04

CLEVELAND — A Cleveland doctor is reporting that more children have been testing positive for COVID-19.

"What we've really been seeing recently is an increase of the percent of tests that are coming back positive, particularly in symptomatic children - meaning that for kids who have symptoms of a respiratory viral disease, a larger percent of them are coronavirus than earlier in the pandemic," Dr. Amy Edwards said. "It's to be expected as the state opens that we're going to start to see more positive kids, but that rate has been going up, and it is something we're keeping our eye on. It hasn't gone up dramatically, about 6 - 7% or so, but it has been a steady increase, and it has not stopped increasing as of yet."

Edwards said that hospital admissions for COVID-19 in children at Rainbow Babies have also increased.

Edwards urged parents not let their guard down and to avoid letting their children attended events that include large crowds.

“A lot of parents were starting to get under the impression that kids couldn’t get coronavirus," Edwards said.

“Parents are having to make a lot of tough decisions about summer camps, about daycares, about schools.”

“We want the world back to normal for our kids, but the world is not a normal place right now. And so while it may sound mean, oh other parents are doing it, they’re going to have a birthday party with 20 kids over, my children are not going.”

“Large gatherings, especially indoor large gatherings are not a good idea. Take it outside, wear your mask, keep it small.”

“I’m not raising alarm bells, I’m simply putting the information out there, because what I don’t want for us to end up like New York or Italy, where we are seeing more kids in the hospital and unfortunately children have lost their lives."

Edwards said fortunately there has not been a pediatric COVID-19 death in the Northeast Ohio area.

Symptoms of COVID-19 in kids are similar to symptoms in adults. If your child seems to be having trouble breathing or is not eating or drinking, Edwards recommends calling your pediatrician to get your child tested.

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